Presidential Wisdom on Blacks

Assembled by Ed Toner

 

I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts, and beer. -- Abraham Lincoln

I can conceive of no greater calamity than the assimilation of the negro into our social and political life as our equal... -- President Abraham Lincoln August 14,1862

From Lincoln-Douglas Debate, published by Haldeman-Julius Company, Girard, Kansas 1923

I agree with Judge Douglas that he (Negroes) is not my equal in many respects, certainly not in color, and perhaps not in moral and intellectual endowment. -- Abraham Lincoln Page 81

I have no purpose to produce political and social equality. I am not in favor of making voters or jurors of Negroes or of qualifying them to hold office or allowing them to intermarry with white people... I have never had the least apprehension that I or my friends would marry Negroes, even if there was no law to keep them from it... I will, to the very last, stand by the law of this state which forbids the marrying of white people with Negroes. -- Abraham Lincoln Page 44

I have no purpose to introduce political and social equality between the white and black races. There is a physical difference between the two, which, in my judgment, will forever forbid their living together in perfect equality: and inasmuch as it becomes a necessity that there should be a difference, I, as well as Judge Douglas, am in favor of the race to which I belong having the supremacy. -- Abraham Lincoln Page 80

From The Collected works of Abraham Lincoln, published 1953, Rutgers University Press in eight volumes. Vol. II Pages 405-409 (Speech at Springfield, Illinois - June 26, 1857.

Judge Douglas has said to you that he has not been able to get me to answer the question whether I am in favor of Negro citizenship. So far as I know, the Judge never asked me the question before (applause) He shall have no occasion to ever ask it again, for I tell him very frankly that I am not in favor of Negro citizenship. (renewed applause)... Now my opinion is that the different states have the power to make a Negro a citizen under the Constitution of the United States if they choose...If the state of Illinois had that power I should be opposed to the exercise of it. (cries of "good," "good," and applause) -- Abraham Lincoln

Vol. II, page 281

Speech at Peoria, Illinois, October 16, 1854

In the course of his reply, Senator Douglas remarked, in substance, that he had always considered this government was made for the white people and not for the Negroes. Why, in pointof mere fact, I think so, too. -- Abraham Lincoln

Vol. III, page 399 Notes for speeches, September 1859

Negro equality! Fudge!! How long, in the government of a God, great enough to make and maintain this Universe, shall there continue knaves to vend, and fools to gulp, so low a piece of demagoguism as this? - Abraham Lincoln

If I thought this war was to abolish slavery, I would resign my commission and offer my sword to the other side" ? -- General U.S. Grant 1862

Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people 'the negroes' are to be free. Nor is it less certain that the two races, equally free, cannot live in the same government.

Nature, habit, opinion has drawn indelible lines of distinction between them. -- Thomas Jefferson in his autobiography

 

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